Private equity group 8F buys RAS equipment supplier, creating vertically integrated land-based salmon farmer
Published by Intrafish by Rachel Mutter · 11 Jul, 2022
The new company's first project will be the construction of a NOK 1.2 billion smolt facility for salmon farmer Salmar.

8F, the global investment firm behind land-based salmon farming company Pure Salmon, has acquired the aquaculture division of Kruger Kaldnes
from Veolia.

Kruger Kaldnes’s aquaculture unit employs 55 people and over the last 15 years has established itself as one of the leading providers of recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS), offering maintenance, consulting, operational support and training.
Its clients include some of the world’s largest fish farming companies such as SalMar, Leroy Seafood Group, and Mowi, recently delivering two of the world’s largest smolt facilities, Helgeland Smolt, owned mostly by Nova Sea, and Leroy Sjotroll.
Most recently, it was selected by SalMar to build one of the world’s largest and most advanced production facilities for juvenile fish.
Confirmed just after the acquisition, Pure Salmon Kaldnes RAS will deliver the technological solutions for this NOK 1.2 billion (€119 million/$145 million) project.
Through its global operating company, Pure Salmon, 8F builds and operates land-based Atlantic salmon facilities worldwide, and is targeting an annual production of 260,000 metric tons.
To date, the group has invested in vertically integrated facilities in the United States, Poland, France and Japan, and is already planning further land-based farming projects in China, South East Asia and the Middle East.
“Our ambition with Pure Salmon is to become the largest global sustainable salmon producer,” said 8F Founder and Chairman of Pure Salmon Stephane Farouze.
“Pure Salmon Kaldnes RAS is a powerful addition to the vertical integration of our business model,” he said.
Kruger Kaldnes CEO Kent Rasmussen, who will remain in his role in the combined company, said the company will remain an integral and active part of the Norwegian aquaculture “ecosystem.”

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